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Paris Was A Woman

Badass female artists, socialites, and icons of the early 1900s.
Brought to you by Chloe Thunders (chloethunders.tumblr.com).

call-him-rita:

Nancy Cunard

call-him-rita:

Nancy Cunard

cantgetanygayer:

Liane De Pougy :)

cantgetanygayer:

Liane De Pougy :)

(via deviatesinc)

cantgetanygayer:

Berenice Abbott (1898-1991)  American photographer.

Abbott worked from 1925 to 1929 as a photographic assistant to May Ray in Paris. Through her work printing Man Ray’s photographs, Abbott herself discovered her talent as a photographer. In 1926 Abbott had her first solo exhibition in the Parisian gallery, Le Sacre du Printemps. This exhibition featured Abbott’s portrait photography in which she captured personalities associated with avant-garde art movements. Portraits of film director Jacques Cocteau, author James Joyce, artist Max Ernst, and poet Edna St. Vincent Millay were featured.

Abbott became picture editor for Science Illustrated in the 1940s and continued in that role through the 1960s, expanding her subject matter to include scientific images. She moved to Maine in 1966 and continued as a science photographer, approaching the world around her methodically, as she had done with her portraits and images of New York. Abbott continued her photography until her death in 1991.

If that’s not enough to convince you of her coolness, also included a pic of her playing table tennis.

(via deviatesinc)

bleuroses:

"Oh, Mitya, come away, let’s fly, Mitya darling — if ever there were two entirely primitive people, they are surely us: let’s go away and forget the world and all its squalor — let’s forget such things as trains, and trams, and servants, and streets, and shops, and money, and cares and responsibilities. Oh god! how I hate it all — you and I, Mitya, were born 2000 years too late, or 2000 years too soon."

Violet Trefusis to Vita Sackville-West

 

greatgdean:

Cleo De Merode

greatgdean:

Cleo De Merode

(via louisepandora)

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Art by Dorte Clara Wolff (Dodo) 1928

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Art by Dorte Clara Wolff (Dodo) 1928

(Source: plusoumoinstrente.blogspot.com)

Total absence of humor renders life impossible.

Colette (via observando)

blackcurator:

The Harp (1939) | Augusta Savage
During construction for the 1939 New York World’s Fair 

blackcurator:

The Harp (1939) | Augusta Savage

During construction for the 1939 New York World’s Fair 

It occurred to me that this taboo [of virginity] may have been intensified by the fact that at one time (in a matriarchal society) the woman may have been the dominant partner. In this way, like the defeated deities, she acquired demonic properties, and was feared as an agent of retribution. Also her defloweration by deity, priests, etc. points back to a time when she was not the “private property” of the male, and in order to achieve this she had to shake off the shackles of her impressive past - which may still play its part as the earliest positive basis for the precautionary measures of the male.

Lou Andreas-Salomé in a personal letter to Freud regarding his essay “The Taboo of Virginity” (via insideoutfox)

holdthisphoto:

Bas de soie de Schiaparelli, Paris, 1940
by Gisèle Freund

holdthisphoto:

Bas de soie de Schiaparelli, Paris, 1940

  • by Gisèle Freund

demaupin:

Portraits by Berenice Abbott of the artists and expatriates of 1920’s Paris and their circle. (via Strange Flowers)

Left to Right: Jane Heap, Jean Cocteau, Sylvia Beach, Princess Marthe Bibesco, Solita Solano, Claude McKay, Djuna Barnes, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Lucia Joyce, Léonard Tsugouharu Foujita.

My personal hobbies are reading, listening to music, and silence.

 Edith Sitwell (via feellng)

(Source: feellng)

debourbon:

Misia Sert in Venice

debourbon:

Misia Sert in Venice

jeannepompadour:

Portrait of the Countess Anna de Noailles by Ignacio Zuloaga,1913

jeannepompadour:

Portrait of the Countess Anna de Noailles by Ignacio Zuloaga,1913

I wondered why it was that places are so much lovelier when one is alone.

Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca (via larmoyante)

Nº. 1 of  40