Nº. 2 of  38

Paris Was A Woman

Badass female artists, socialites, and icons of the early 1900s.
Brought to you by Chloe Thunders (chloethunders.tumblr.com).

thingsifoundatwork:

Berenice Abbott, Cocteau’s Hands, 1927

thingsifoundatwork:

Berenice Abbott, Cocteau’s Hands, 1927

(via angeheurtebise)

call-him-rita:

Anaïs Nin

call-him-rita:

Anaïs Nin

lunawoman:

Cleo De Merode by Giovanni Boldini 1901

lunawoman:

Cleo De Merode by Giovanni Boldini 1901

(via alcohols)

deviatesinc:

Dolly Wilde at the wheel

deviatesinc:

Dolly Wilde at the wheel

jeannepompadour:

"La Repetition" by Marie Laurencin, 1936

jeannepompadour:

"La Repetition" by Marie Laurencin, 1936

(via deviatesinc)

holdthisphoto:

Tamara de Lempicka, 1938

holdthisphoto:

Tamara de Lempicka, 1938

(via deviatesinc)

bloomsburyist:

Erika Mann, c. 1913-1915: practicing gymnastics; playing Prince Charming in a production of Cinderella.  

(Source: seven-middagh, via deviatesinc)

kidney-stoner:

my reason to love expressionism,
my newest hero

Suzanne Valadon

kidney-stoner:

my reason to love expressionism,

my newest hero

Suzanne Valadon

"I love her and that’s the beginning and end of everything."

Scott about Zelda, 1920

(Source: fitzgeraldquotes)

I did not know that Vita could love like this, had loved like this, because she would not speak of it to her son. Now that I know everything I love her more, as my father did, because she was tempted, because she was weak. She was a rebel, she was Julian [Vita’s alter ego], and though she did not know it, she fought for more than Violet. She fought for the right to love, men and women, rejecting the conventions that marriage demands exclusive love, and that women should love only men, and men only women. For this she was prepared to give up everything. Yes, she may have been mad, as she later said, but it was a magnificent folly. She may have been cruel, but it was a cruelty on a heroic scale. How can I despise the violence of such passion?

Portrait of a Marriage: Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson (via courcel)

(via sangfroidwoolf)

seven-middagh:

Tiny pictures from Auf der schwelle des fremden: Annemarie Schwarzenbach a) goes skiing (/”skiing”) with Klaus Mann (the Engadin); b) holds baby goats with Ella Maillart (Indore); c) communes with her car/makes eyes at Barbara Hamilton-Wright (Cincinnati?) 

(via deviatesinc)

ohmarlenemarlene:

Marlene Dietrich

ohmarlenemarlene:

Marlene Dietrich

(via labelleotero)

I’m so odd, and I’m so limited, and I’m so different from the ordinary human being—so you say. I have a strong suspicion that I’m the simplest of you all, and that its my extreme transparency that baffles you. I dont think I ever feel anything but the most ordinary emotions.

Virginia Woolf, from a letter to Ethel Smyth  (via chandr-a)

(Source: violentwavesofemotion, via iwhohavenoface)

chagalov:

Emmy Hennings on stage as “truth-speaking” spider, 1915  [+](mention: Nachlass Hugo Ball und Emmy Hennings / Robert Walser-Stiftung Zurich)
Hennings was then working with the Maxim vaudeville troupe in Zürich. In her diary, she described a stint as the Greek mythological figure Arachne who was to offer “Eternal Truth, only 20 centimes” :

Eternal Truth comes from me of course and I find it comical. And that it should come so cheap. As if what we demand were not worth much. A theatre death, a real variety death would be the right thing for me. One would really like to be the truth, not only appear to be it, and if I were to be found entangled in my net I would be the truth. Masked to the very last. […] We believe in the proven truth of illusion.

Photo and quote from :  Ruth Hemus, Dada’s Women (Yale University Press - New Haven & London, 2009)

chagalov:

Emmy Hennings on stage as “truth-speaking” spider, 1915  [+]
(mention: Nachlass Hugo Ball und Emmy Hennings / Robert Walser-Stiftung Zurich)

Hennings was then working with the Maxim vaudeville troupe in Zürich. In her diary, she described a stint as the Greek mythological figure Arachne who was to offer “Eternal Truth, only 20 centimes” :

Eternal Truth comes from me of course and I find it comical. And that it should come so cheap. As if what we demand were not worth much. A theatre death, a real variety death would be the right thing for me. One would really like to be the truth, not only appear to be it, and if I were to be found entangled in my net I would be the truth. Masked to the very last. […] We believe in the proven truth of illusion.

Photo and quote from :  Ruth Hemus, Dada’s Women (Yale University Press - New Haven & London, 2009)

Nº. 2 of  38