Nº. 2 of  40

Paris Was A Woman

Badass female artists, socialites, and icons of the early 1900s.
Brought to you by Chloe Thunders (chloethunders.tumblr.com).

mythologyofblue:

Dora Maar, Le simulateur, 1936
[Note: Maar’s haunting photomontages of the mid-1930s evoke a mood of oneiric ambiguity. Here, the world is turned literally upside-down: a boy bends sharply backward, echoing the curve of the vaulted ceiling on which he stands. On the print, Maar scratched out the figure’s eyes, exploiting Surrealism’s strong association of blindness with inner sight.]
 

mythologyofblue:

Dora MaarLe simulateur, 1936

[Note: Maar’s haunting photomontages of the mid-1930s evoke a mood of oneiric ambiguity. Here, the world is turned literally upside-down: a boy bends sharply backward, echoing the curve of the vaulted ceiling on which he stands. On the print, Maar scratched out the figure’s eyes, exploiting Surrealism’s strong association of blindness with inner sight.]

 

cavetocanvas:

Suzanne Valadon, Nude Fixing her Hair, 1920

cavetocanvas:

Suzanne Valadon, Nude Fixing her Hair, 1920

vintagegal:

Josephine Baker performing in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1936

mudwerks:

(via THE BLUE LANTERN: Garish Days)
Madame Baker, reprinted from Ulk, 1928, State Museum, Berlin. 

Dodo, given name: Dorte Clara Wolff (1907-1998)  The artist studied at the prestigious Reimann Art School.  She had a successful career in fashion illustration but is best known for her caricatures that appeared in the satirical magazine Ulk, published in Berlin.   If you think her images portray alienation between women and men, you have understood her work.

mudwerks:

(via THE BLUE LANTERN: Garish Days)

Madame Baker, reprinted from Ulk, 1928, State Museum, Berlin. 

Dodo, given name: Dorte Clara Wolff (1907-1998)  The artist studied at the prestigious Reimann Art School.  She had a successful career in fashion illustration but is best known for her caricatures that appeared in the satirical magazine Ulk, published in Berlin.   If you think her images portray alienation between women and men, you have understood her work.

Caresse Crosby (born Mary Phelps Jacob, April 20, 1891 – January 26, 1970) was the first recipient of a patent for the modernbra, an American patron of the arts, publisher, and the “literary godmother to the Lost Generation of expatriate writers in Paris.” She and her second husband, Harry Crosby, founded the Black Sun Press which was instrumental in publishing early works of many authors who would later become famous, including Kay Boyle, Hart Crane, Archibald MacLeish, Ernest Hemingway, Robert Duncan,Anaïs Nin, and Henry Miller.
Crosby’s parents, William Hearn Jacob and Mary Phelps, were both descended from American colonial families, William from the Van Rensselaer family and Mary from William Phelps. Her life at first followed convention. In 1915, she married Richard R. Peabody, another blue blooded Bostonian. They had two children, but following Richard’s service in World War I, Richard became a drunk who loved to watch buildings burn. She met Harry Crosby at a picnic in 1920 and they had sex within two weeks. Their public relationship scandalized proper Boston society.
Two years later Richard granted her a divorce and Harry and Polly were married. They immediately left for Europe, where they joined the Lost Generation of American expatriates. They embraced a bohemian and decadent lifestyle, living off of Harry’s trust fund of US$12,000 a year (or about $165,000 in today’s dollars), had an open marriage with numerous ongoing affairs, a suicide pact, frequent drug use, wild parties, and long trips abroad. At her husband’s urging, Polly took the name Caresse in 1924. In 1925 they began publishing their own poetry as Éditions Narcisse in exquisitely printed, limited-edition volumes. In 1927 they re-christened the business as the Black Sun Press.
In 1929 one of her husband’s affairs culminated in his death as part of a murder-suicide or double suicide. His death was marked by scandal as the newspapers speculated wildly about whether Harry shot his lover or not. Caresse returned to Paris where she continued to run the Black Sun Press. With the prospect of war looming, she left Europe in 1936 and married Selbert Young, an unemployed, alcoholic actor sixteen years her junior. They lived on a Virginia plantation they rehabilitated outside Washington D.C. until she divorced him. She moved to Washington D.C. and began a long-term love affair with black actor-boxer Canada Lee, despite the threat of miscegenation laws. She founded Women Against War. She continued after World War II to try to establish a Center for World Peace at Delphi, Greece. When rebuffed by Greek authorities, she purchased Castello di Rocca Sinibalda, a 15th-century castle north of Rome, which she used to support an artists’ colony. She died of pneumonia related to heart disease in Rome in 1970.

Caresse Crosby (born Mary Phelps Jacob, April 20, 1891 – January 26, 1970) was the first recipient of a patent for the modernbra, an American patron of the arts, publisher, and the “literary godmother to the Lost Generation of expatriate writers in Paris.” She and her second husband, Harry Crosby, founded the Black Sun Press which was instrumental in publishing early works of many authors who would later become famous, including Kay BoyleHart CraneArchibald MacLeishErnest HemingwayRobert Duncan,Anaïs Nin, and Henry Miller.

Crosby’s parents, William Hearn Jacob and Mary Phelps, were both descended from American colonial families, William from the Van Rensselaer family and Mary from William Phelps. Her life at first followed convention. In 1915, she married Richard R. Peabody, another blue blooded Bostonian. They had two children, but following Richard’s service in World War I, Richard became a drunk who loved to watch buildings burn. She met Harry Crosby at a picnic in 1920 and they had sex within two weeks. Their public relationship scandalized proper Boston society.

Two years later Richard granted her a divorce and Harry and Polly were married. They immediately left for Europe, where they joined the Lost Generation of American expatriates. They embraced a bohemian and decadent lifestyle, living off of Harry’s trust fund of US$12,000 a year (or about $165,000 in today’s dollars), had an open marriage with numerous ongoing affairs, a suicide pact, frequent drug use, wild parties, and long trips abroad. At her husband’s urging, Polly took the name Caresse in 1924. In 1925 they began publishing their own poetry as Éditions Narcisse in exquisitely printed, limited-edition volumes. In 1927 they re-christened the business as the Black Sun Press.

In 1929 one of her husband’s affairs culminated in his death as part of a murder-suicide or double suicide. His death was marked by scandal as the newspapers speculated wildly about whether Harry shot his lover or not. Caresse returned to Paris where she continued to run the Black Sun Press. With the prospect of war looming, she left Europe in 1936 and married Selbert Young, an unemployed, alcoholic actor sixteen years her junior. They lived on a Virginia plantation they rehabilitated outside Washington D.C. until she divorced him. She moved to Washington D.C. and began a long-term love affair with black actor-boxer Canada Lee, despite the threat of miscegenation laws. She founded Women Against War. She continued after World War II to try to establish a Center for World Peace at Delphi, Greece. When rebuffed by Greek authorities, she purchased Castello di Rocca Sinibalda, a 15th-century castle north of Rome, which she used to support an artists’ colony. She died of pneumonia related to heart disease in Rome in 1970.

deviatesinc:

Bryher, 1929

deviatesinc:

Bryher, 1929

roud6294:

‘Song XVI’ from Songs to Joannes by Mina Loy (1915-1917)

roud6294:

‘Song XVI’ from Songs to Joannes by Mina Loy (1915-1917)

etund:

Margo Lion and Wilhelm Bendow, 1927

etund:

Margo Lion and Wilhelm Bendow, 1927

deviatesinc:

1912 poster for a Claire Waldoff performance in Berlin, by Jo Stiener

deviatesinc:

1912 poster for a Claire Waldoff performance in Berlin, by Jo Stiener

taurasdubouquin:

Agnes Noyes Goodsir

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Elsa Schiaparelli photographed by Andre Durst 1936

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Elsa Schiaparelli photographed by Andre Durst 1936

At least I have the flowers of myself,
and my thoughts, no god
can take that;
I have the fervour of myself for a presence
and my own spirit for light;

and my spirit with its loss
knows this;
though small against the black,
small against the formless rocks,
hell must break before I am lost;

before I am lost,
hell must open like a red rose
for the dead to pass.

H.D., Eurydice VII (via arpeggia)

theladybadass:

Alice Prin (aka Kiki de Montparnasse) in Dadaist 1924 short film, Ballet Mécanique

Nº. 2 of  40